Sunday, December 21, 2014

The 12 Picks Of Christmas



Merry Christmas, everyone!  As one of our last podcasts of the year, we decided to share recommendations that we all thought our individual cohosts would like but we've never had the chance to bring up on the show yet.  Each of us picked a book and a movie for the other two hosts and we came up with some great stuff, from the highbrow to Kevin Bacon.

There was a small tech snafu on this one so the end has been a bit truncated; rest assured those responsible have been sacked.

Where to find the podcast itself and us

Listen At Podomatic

Subscribe and rate us at iTunes 

We are also available on the Stitcher app.

Our Twitters:

Joseph
Amy
Randy

Tuesday, December 9, 2014

Episode 33 - Who You Callin' a "Lady" Detective?

Joe's got a cold and sounds like it, Amy's got a cold and sounds perfectly healthy next to Joe. Randy lives in the land of socialized medicine and is fine. 


Joe had the theme for this time around and asked for "lady detectives."



Show notes

Intro Music: "We Used to Be Friends" by The Dandy Warhols
Exit Music: "It's a Shame about Ray" by The Lemonheads 

  • Amy's still working her way through "Transparent" and is trying to get caught up on "Arrow."
  • Randy's watching "The Comeback" but he's not sure if he's ready to talk about it yet.
  • Joe got his vroom on, watching "Fast Five" and "The Fast and Furious 6"
  • Joe's right that Martin Starr, James Franco, and Dave Allen are all Freaks & Geeks alumni who show up in "Veronica Mars." However, an imdb overlap search reveals that Percy Daggs III (Wallace) was "Mathlete #2" in a F&G episode.
  • It is Rob Thomas who's written both of the Veronica Mars books so far: 2014's The Thousand-Dollar Tan Line and 2015's Mr. Kiss and Tell
  • Rob Thomas's non-Veronica Mars book, written prior to the tv show, is Rats Saw God
  • Logan's yellow Nissan was an Xterra:


  • The MOST PRECIOUS COMMERCIAL starring Kristen Bell and Dax Shepard:

On the next episode

Amy asked for "Runners-up." Joe's having us read Walter Tevis's 1981 book Mockingbird, which was nominated for a Nebula but lost to Timescape by Gregory Benford. Randy's happy to have a reason finally to select for the podcast "Fish Tank" which won the Jury Prize at Cannes in 2009, but did not win the Palme D'Or which went to "The White Ribbon." I guess director Andrea Arnold will have to console herself with her Best British Film BAFTA.


Where to find the podcast itself and us

Listen at Podomatic

Subscribe and rate us at iTunes 

We are also available on the Stitcher app.

Our Twitters:

Joseph
Amy
Randy

Monday, December 1, 2014

Quiz Time - Characters Welcome



Joseph delivers a devilish quiz where he gives Randy and Amy the names of two characters and asks them to guess the actor who played both. It's completely unfair!

Where to find the podcast itself and us
We are also available on the Stitcher app.

Our Twitters:

Randy

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Episode 32 - Creation, Not the God Kind

Amy's back. If you're singing a certain Elton John song now, she'll hunt you down and bite your kneecaps.

Randy had the theme for this time around and wanted works that discuss the creation of art.


Show notes

Intro Music: "Ca Plane Pour Moi" by Plastic Bertrand (YouTube)
Exit Music: "A Picture of Dorian Gray" by Television Personalities (YouTube)

  • Amy's recommending, when and if it gets to a theater near you, "What We Do in the Shadows" a vampire mockumentary from New Zealand (trailer)
  • Randy didn't necessarily like, but wants you to watch, "Whiplash" (in theaters now-ish) (imdb)
  • Joseph recommends a documentary about Los Angeles as it's appeared in the movies: "Los Angeles Plays Itself" (available on Netflix streaming and on DVD) 
  • The picture of Dorian Gray that Joe was talking about seeing at the Art Institute of Chicago is by Ivan Albright
  • Amy picked the Plastic Bertrand song because it was used in Ruby Sparks, but in reading up on it was amused to learn that the individual who made his debut as the personality Plastic Bertrand with this song, was actually faking it - the producer of the song sang all the vocals. Somehow that seems almost appropriate for our theme.

On the next episode

Joe wanted "lady detectives" so Randy's giving him Veronica Mars in the eponymous film from earlier this year and Amy's picking The Spellman Files, the first in a series of books by Lisa Lutz.




Where to find the podcast itself and us

Listen at Podomatic

Subscribe and rate us at iTunes 

We are also available on the Stitcher app.

Our Twitters:

Joseph
Amy
Randy

Buffy Rewatch: She Saved The World. A Lot.

Season 5 comes to its brilliant, devastating conclusion in "The Gift".


"She's a hero, you see. She's not like us."


And there you have it.

Xander proposes to Anya. Giles kills Ben. Spike has one of his greatest moments, and then his greatest failure. Willow continues her impressive growth as a witch and saves Tara. And Buffy sacrifices herself to save Dawn and the world.

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Buffy Rewatch: Carry That Weight

Glory looks for, and finds, the Key as we set up season 5's endgame.


"You've carried the weight of the world on your shoulders since high school. I know you didn't ask for this. But you do it."


Let's just quickly recap the show putting the pieces in place before the fifth season finale.

In many ways, "Forever" is a more traditional episode dealing with the death of a character than "The Body" was. "The Body" was about shock, but "Forever" is about grief. It's not a great episode, but it has great moments. Angel appears, and has a couple of lovely scenes with Buffy. Xander and Anya have a very nice post-sex chat, where we see Anya really start to grow up. And, best of all, there's a brief moment of Giles listening to Cream and no doubt reliving his and Joyce's "Band Candy" shenanigans. (It's a great moment of private grief, and so very Giles.)

Saturday, November 15, 2014

Buffy Rewatch: Mom? Mom? ... Mommy?

A few thoughts on "The Body", the landmark episode in which Buffy's mom dies.


"We're not drawing the object. We're drawing the negative space around the object."


"The Body", for good and bad, is unlike any other episode of BUFFY. Its subject matter - the shock of Joyce's death, as felt separately by Buffy, by Dawn, and by the rest of the Scoobies - allows writer/director Joss Whedon to experiment with structure, tone, direction, and editing. Often, this works. But not always.